How to Host: Lessons from a Private Room Pro

in
New York, NY
Level 6
40,163 Views

Veteran Superhost Marcella Lentz-Pope created one of the most popular Airbnb listings in Brooklyn (and the world). Here, she shares her expert tips on opening up a private room in your home.

     

 

Actress Marcella Lentz-Pope is no stranger to strangers. Since 2013, she’s hosted thousands of guests from all over the world at her loft in Bushwick, Brooklyn. Whether you’re new to Airbnb and considering sharing a space in your home, or an experienced host looking to improve your skills, read on for Marcella’s expert advice on making the most of private room hosting.

 

 

How I started hosting

I first started hosting in Los Angeles, where I shared rooms in my Downtown LA loft. When I moved to New York City in 2016, I brought hosting with me, and created The Funky Loft. The space was originally an open and bare studio which I immediately built into a four bedroom apartment—three of which I share with guests throughout the year. I decorated it with eclectic vintage pieces, plants galore and unique furniture. Because of its style, it attracts a lot of photographers so I also list it for photo and film shoots. Over the years I’ve learned quite a lot from sharing my home. If you’re nervous or unsure about how to start sharing your space, here are some tips that might help you feel more comfortable.

     

Marcella’s Tips for Private Room Hosting

  1. Know thyself
  2. Make your rules must-reads
  3. Take time for face time
  4. Set clear boundaries
  5. Keep it communal

 

1. Know thyself.

Be honest with yourself! Hosting a private room in your home isn’t for everyone. If you’re someone who values privacy above all or you’re very protective of people touching your belongings, hosting in your home may not be a good fit for you. But—if you’re a bit more open to sharing your space, it can be incredibly rewarding.

 

For me, it’s nice to come home at the end of the day and have people there. It’s like coming home to a big family. I love that I can just go downstairs and hang out with someone from halfway around the world. I really enjoy it… and you might too!

 

“I love that I can just go downstairs and hang out with someone from halfway around the world.”

 

2. Make your rules a must-read

It’s super important to make sure your guests read your house rules to ensure that everyone is on the same page. This is important for all hosts, but especially when it comes to sharing the space. To make sure no one misses my rules, I actually put them in three places: I write all of my rules and important information directly in my listing description, as well as under the House Rules section. In my home, I also leave a printed copy in a binder in the common area in case they’d like to familiarize themselves with the rules again.

 

When a potential guest writes me or uses Instant Book, I’ll ask them: “Did you read the house rules? Do you have any questions about them?” This helps ensure that everyone knows exactly what to expect before they arrive.

 

Over the years I’ve learned that common sense isn’t always common. People come to your space from different backgrounds, upbringings, and cultural norms. So think about what makes your home different than others. Do you have set quiet hours? Do you prefer that guests remove their shoes when they come in? Do you allow Airbnb guests to bring their own additional guests over? We all have boundaries and they’re important to make explicit.

 

Also know that your rules will evolve. You’re going to make mistakes, but mistakes are important. I remember the time a guest brought a stranger over without telling me. I thought that was an obvious rule for a shared space. After that experience I learned that I needed to put a rule into the listing stating that guests can not invite other guests over who are not part of the original booking. You’re going to learn from these moments. Experience is honestly the best teacher you can have as a host.

 

Read Marcella’s Funky Loft rules >

And remember, these are specific to her home!

 

3. Take time for face time

It’s important to me to meet my guests in person. I want to be there to welcome them, check them in to the space, give them a tour, and go over any ground rules myself. It’s a chance for me to see their reaction to the space, ask them questions I might have, and learn a bit about who I’m sharing my space with. It makes them more comfortable and you more comfortable. Guests love that little extra touch and often mention it in their reviews.

 

When a guest books, I’ll ask them when their plane/bus/train is arriving and factor in travel time so that I can plan my schedule accordingly, and be there to greet them. For people who are just beginning their hosting journey, this can be a great way for you to ease any uncertainty. You’ll likely discover “Oh, I like these people. This is awesome!” If, for some reason I can’t be there myself, I’ll have a trusted friend show them everything—then I can say “hi” later in the day.

 

This is my way of doing things, and I think it’s a great approach, especially when you and your guests are sharing your space at the same time. But I know not every host can personally check their guests in. Lots of people allow guests to check themselves in by providing lock boxes, and that can work really well, too. It’s all about finding out what works best for you.

 

Marcella loft.jpg

 

4. Set clear boundaries

When you’re opening your home to new people, it’s important to be very clear about which spaces and items are communal, and what’s private just for you. It’s nice to make space for your guests’ belongings by clearing a drawer for them in the dresser, making space in the fridge for their food, and putting some empty hangers in the closet. You can show people at check-in what things they can and can’t use and what spaces are private. Some hosts also use little signs indicating when a space or item is personal and not to be shared if that jives with their design sensibility!

If you have valuables or important documents to protect, I recommend getting a safe or lock box. If you have one, a room designated in your house that’s locked with a key just for you. I also offer lockers for guests to use and store valuables if they want to bring their own lock. That's the thing about a shared space: if you're trusting them, they're also trusting you.

 

5. Keep it communal

Design your communal spaces to be inviting and comfortable. It’s all about creating a welcoming vibe. Add touches and details that encourage people to meet, hang out, and feel at home. Of course, if they would rather keep to themselves, that’s also OK!  For example:

  • Get a comfy couch where people can relax and unwind.
  • Have a large dining table that invites people to sit and share meals together. One of the little bonuses I offer is breakfast in the morning. It's nothing fancy—cereals, toast, coffee, tea—but it's just a little something to start their day and a way for everyone to mingle and connect…if they want.
  • Create a playlist of music to set the tone. I’ve found that oldies are pretty universal. Turning on music in the morning signals to people that they don’t have to be quiet in the space anymore. It lets them know everyone's awake and they don’t have to tiptoe around the house. The same goes for turning it off at night: it lets guests know people are going to sleep and that it’s time to be quiet.
  • Add universal adapters to your guest rooms and common spaces. People come from all over the world and they often forget adapters. Having adapters is a simple way to be tech-inclusive. I also have a power strip in each room so guests aren’t limited to two outlets.

 

Remember, anyone who has an extra room to share can be a host. You don’t need anything fancy; just an open mind—it’s the thoughtful little details that add up to a special experience!

 

Happy hosting!

-Marcella

 

Want to incorporate some of Marcella’s tips in your own listing? Update your listing. Not a host? Become one today.

 

Book a stay with Marcella at the Funky Loft. Follow The Funky Loft or Marcella on Instagram.

 

Check out the full #howtohost series.

Labels (2)
65 Replies

Re: How to Host: Lessons from a Private Room Pro

in
Grand Ledge, MI
Level 1

Hi, great tips. I had not thought of having universal adapters. I do frequently have guests traveling from outside the U.S.

 

Also the sound cue for morning and evening could be useful, especially in the morning.

 

— Thanks. 

 

Re: How to Host: Lessons from a Private Room Pro

Administrator in
London, United Kingdom
Administrator

Hey @Connie266

 

Great to meet you. I’m just going to @ mention @Marcella26 here so she gets notified about your lovely comment. 🙂 

 


--------------------


I'm currently on maternity leave. I look forward to catching up when I return. In the meantime, please contact another member of the Community Manager team: Personal Update


Looking to contact our Support Team, for details...take a look at the Community Help Guides

Re: How to Host: Lessons from a Private Room Pro

in
New York, NY
Level 6

Glad to help Connie!  So many guests have remarked how helpful it is to have an adapter and even said “oh good, I totally forgot mine!”.  It’s definiyely starting their  stay on the right foot and already putting a good thought in their mind about you as a host. 

 

 If you’d like to use my  loft playlist for a while you have guests, here’s the link! 

 

https://open.spotify.com/user/marcellamarceau/playlist/5Bk2ewS8rwXOLI27kE2lFd?si=fIZIH-ASQM-z_QDtE0q...

 

Happy hosting 🙂

Marcella 

Re: How to Host: Lessons from a Private Room Pro

Administrator in
London, United Kingdom
Administrator

Wow, there are some absolute classics on this playlist @Marcella26. I think I know what I'm going to be playing all week! haha! 🙂 

 

How often do you update your playlist and do you guests ever comment on it, perhaps give you some suggestions you might like?  

 


--------------------


I'm currently on maternity leave. I look forward to catching up when I return. In the meantime, please contact another member of the Community Manager team: Personal Update


Looking to contact our Support Team, for details...take a look at the Community Help Guides

Re: How to Host: Lessons from a Private Room Pro

in
New York, NY
Level 6

Thanks Lizzie!  ENJOY!

I update it every time I hear something I think should be added so it’s constantly getting a sprucing up.

And many guests have actually asked about my playlist and I’ll give them the info to follow it so they can use.  It’s kind of cool how the loft will be sticking with people much after they leave with my playlist 🙂

Re: How to Host: Lessons from a Private Room Pro

in
Bali, Indonesia
Level 3

Thanks Marcella, I am now listening to your Loft playlist.

 

I may play the list when guests first arrive as it’s a good selection of music.

 

cheers

Andy

Re: How to Host: Lessons from a Private Room Pro

in
Bali, Indonesia
Level 3

Re: How to Host: Lessons from a Private Room Pro

in
Bali, Indonesia
Level 10

@Connie266 

 

how about a USB charging dock.. 6 slot and adjustable amp, depending to the connected device spec and it's batteries quantity.. 

 

every body charge using USB, can even charge laptop.. but not hair dryer though.. just some thoughts.. 

 

Cheers

Jeffrey Bong

Re: How to Host: Lessons from a Private Room Pro

in
Auckland, New Zealand
Level 10

Thanks for sharing your personal experience  @Marcella26 

 

What acting roles have you undertaken?
I had a lovely Guest, Corrin, come to stay in my home from USA who is an actress.

She's currently traveling around the world & makes a great ambassador for the acting industry, ABB & her home city.

 

A random question, what is the most common name of your Guests who have stayed?

 

Do you keep a journal for Guests to write there thoughts about there stay?
Or a journal to help breakdown any Language barriers to expand your knowledge of Languages?

Do you now speak & write in more than one Language, if so which one/s?

 

All the best

Central To All Home & Location, Auckland, New Zealand

Re: How to Host: Lessons from a Private Room Pro

in
New York, NY
Level 6

Hi @Helen427!

I’ve done lots of random things.  Funny, I actually voiced a character named Corrin in a very popular video game series. You can see more specifics of work I’ve done here:

https://m.imdb.com/name/nm1719288/?ref_=m_nv_sr_1

 

I haven’t really noticed what the most common name is but we have had a few repeats. I have hosted 3 Marcella’s which are the only times I’ve ever met someone else with the same name as me!

 

We have sticky notes that guest right on and put on our refrigerator. It’s nice because they leave knowing they are a part of the loft now.

 

Since we have so many guess from all over the world with a quick turnaround there isn’t really enough time for me to improve on any language or for it to stick.  But it does help me keep the little Spanish, French and Portuguese I know from fading away.  But guests English always gets better after visiting! I think if I was the one visiting another country my language would get better… Which might be a hint that it’s time for me to travel 😉

 

Happy hosting!

Re: How to Host: Lessons from a Private Room Pro

Level 2

Awesome interview. I would love to do that! Have had Melodysplacelodging.org for 20 years.

Re: How to Host: Lessons from a Private Room Pro

in
New York, NY
Level 6

You absoutely can!  I hope the tips are useful and good luck with future hosting 🙂

Marcella

Re: How to Host: Lessons from a Private Room Pro

in
Rabat, Morocco
Level 10

Salute @Marcella26

 

Really, thank you very much for sharing with us these so helpful informations, playlist, videos and for everything. 

 

Thanks, 

Miloud

Re: How to Host: Lessons from a Private Room Pro

in
New York, NY
Level 6

You’re very welcome Miloud!  Happy hosting 🙂

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