My listing was suspended after reporting party to Airbnb

Faith147
Level 2
Toronto, Canada

My listing was suspended after reporting party to Airbnb

I'm a new host and last night we had a guest stay in our property and host an unauthorized party. We reported the incident to Airbnb (big mistake!) to create a paper trail. Now airbnb has suspended our listing "due to the ongoing safety investigation" and refuses to give us the contact information for the agent in charge of investigation. Apparently, we're only allowed to speak to them when they initiate the conversation and we've been told that we're going to be given updates every three days. 

 

I've made it clear to them that there is no safety issue, I just wanted the unauthorized guests off my property. It seems to me that as the host I'm being penalized for guests breaking house rules. 

 

Has anyone had this issue before and can give me insight into the process? They're being very secretive about this "investigation" and won't give me a timeline in terms of how long the investigation will take and thus the ongoing suspension. Is there anything we can do about it?

25 Replies 25
Shishi3
Level 2
null

@Faith147 how did you eventually solve this? I’m in the same predicament. The guest claimed that only 10 people would be at the premises. When we showed up we found over 50 people, smoking, drinking and even charging others to get into the “party”. They even had a drink menu with drinks FOR SALE at the house. We kicked them out then reported the guest to AirBnb. Unfortunately, this resulted in our listing being suspended and I don’t know what to do. 

Kristen479
Level 2
Jacksonville, FL

There are many sad stories that I am hearing about all I can say from my experience is that I keep trying to talk to AirBnB until I finally get a person and when I finally do get a real person I have found that they do try to help, I’m not saying that AirBnB is perfect but I have not been banned and I have complained about guests, it’s always seems to work out if you’re open and transparent with AirBnB, I do not complain about them because they are helping me make money if you’re going to threaten to sue them I can understand why they don’t want to talk to you. I’m not saying that that is right believe me, it’s just that I think that they really want to keep their hosts and they’re doing their best, and maybe you just got the wrong representative that day so call back and get another one. The post that I have seen reflective hosts that really care about their properties and have just run into some unfortunate problems with guests. I understand that they are sad and I empathize if it happened to me I would be brokenhearted. I always worry about something bad happening to me but so far I have been lucky. I wish you well but keep trying to talk to AirBnB and work with them because they are the people that are enabling you to Make money, if you want to go to another platform that Is your right, but if you like Airbnb as I do try to get it to work. Of course I have not been through crisis and major damage, so all I can say is I’m sorry if that is happened to you.

Emilie
Online Community Manager
Online Community Manager
London, United Kingdom

Hey @Faith147

 

I just wanted to let you know I've dropped you a note on this issue's progression. You can read it by accessing your Messages on the Community Center - simply hover over your profile picture in the top right corner and click on Messages:

 

Screenshot 2022-04-27 at 10.07.05.png

 

Thanks, 

Emilie

 

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Helen744
Level 10
Victoria, Australia

@Faith147, its not illegal for a bloke to *bleep* against a fence on private property . What is illegal is you filming him do it . If it was shared property or seen from the street then it probably comes under 'exposure 'or something but otherwise it is just a bloke doing a bloke thing.Call of nature. I do think cameras are causing a lot of problems and people with them inside the house are really taking liberties. I did think getting an outdoor camera was a good idea but after hearing about all the spying on guests and the problems caused I have changed my mind. Some things I do not need to see. A persons privacy is just that . It seems to have become a free for all with hosts being outraged by others behaviour which frankly is not ever their business.H

Vivian1055
Level 2
null

@Helen744 Our home has two full bathrooms available. This man (who was not a pre-approved guest), decided to use our flower beds as a toilet

 

I'm sure you wouldn't appreciate it if some strange man came into your private back yard and urinated on your flower bed. It's just not respectful.

Helen744
Level 10
Victoria, Australia

@Vivian1055 What the eye does not see , the heart does not grieve about. I am no more interested in what this person did than fly to the moon. H

Mark116
Level 10
Jersey City, NJ

@Helen744  How could it possibly be illegal to film someone on your own property after having diclosed to them that the cameras are there?  If people then go on to do dumb/illegal stuff that is recorded by the camera, that's on them.

Helen744
Level 10
Victoria, Australia

@ Mark116 because Mark it is their privacy not yours. It is not your home currently although it is your property.The things that  you are seeing are private. All those cameras are  for you to know who comes and goes . Nothing else. I am not surprised that guests are outraged .There are other ways to find out who is at your house and this should be done before people arrive. Normal ordinairy families expect privacy . I have not heard one person tell me that they protect their guests privacy so your ' oh look what they dids ' are just a justification for using cameras in unintended for purpose, ways. H

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Helen744
Level 10
Victoria, Australia

@Mark116 and Faith 147 I understood the cameras were simply on the doorway to film arrivals for head counts nothing more. security is taken care of by 'due diligence'. Checking and having ids of all guests,  checking in with current guests and greeting guests and settling them in as well as communicating both before and during so that all is clear and above board. I can see no value whatsoever in spying on people as a security measure in most of these posts. Because you actually let them in in the first place .It does not matter how outraged you become peering thru the shruberries. This is not 'security' which should be established before those guests set foot any where near your property. H

Faith147
Level 2
Toronto, Canada

At no point did I say it was illegal to *bleep* on a host's property. Disrespectful? Definitely. Airbnb's documentation says that it is well within a hosts rights to install outdoor cameras as long as it's disclosed and it is. It's not like we took a camera to specifically film him *bleep* in my backyard. We reviewed our camera footage after confirming that there were more people in our home than they disclosed.

 

You may be missing the point here. What is my business is my property potentially being damaged. After reporting that to Airbnb somehow as the host I'm being penalized for a guest throwing a party in my home. 

Helen2252
Level 2
Norcross, GA

It happened to me last Sunday. Did they contact you? What is the status of your listing now?

Vivian1055
Level 2
null

Co-host here: Our home is still under investigation, and it will take three days to even receive a response from the Airbnb case manager. Every day it's off the market, it is messing with our financial health. We spent thousands of dollars renovating and making our home beautiful for guests, and now we are forced to miss out on thousands of potential dollars because we followed the rules.

Airbnb is literally messing with our livelihoods by doing this.

Mark116
Level 10
Jersey City, NJ

@Stephanie  FYI this is what we were talking about in the other thread about Airbnb's so called anti party policy.  Airbnb is still punishing hosts and giving the benefit of the doubt to guests who break house rules and laws, as I think relieving yourself in public is probably some kind of misdemeanor. Really disapointing.

Helen744
Level 10
Victoria, Australia

@Mark116 until very recently a law existed in Australia which allowed a male to urinate against the outside wheel  of any carriage On long trips through Australia do not be surprised to see men doing so outside , generally against a fence,  as in some areas public toilets are few and fences are many . Urine by the way is sterile when it leaves the human body . Lemon trees like it apparently. Lighten up people. There is no law against urinating against a fence in a private home , it may not be desirable depending on circumstances H

Stephanie
Online Community Manager
Online Community Manager
London, United Kingdom

I appreciate the tag @Mark116 - right over to the policy people with this one, too.

 

Thanks


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Michael5689
Level 10
Mountain View, CA

Just based on your explanation...did you have the backyard cameras clearly disclosed ahead of time in your listing?
Mike

Faith147
Level 2
Toronto, Canada

Yes, it's mentioned twice in the listing. And I know that they're aware of it because they pointed at the camera, made faces at it and then proceeded to pee anyway. 

Michael5689
Level 10
Mountain View, CA

Just a hunch that it's related to that since they are calling in a "Safety" review.  If you mentioned specifically what it recorded that probably initiated some more review too.  It may have been the straw that broke the camels back for you, but that sort of recorded behavior will set off additional alarm bells at AirBNB.  It may be a better future strategy to just push the exceeding the max number of guests angle with support and not mention what really sent your over the edge.  You may have done everything correctly and to the letter of the regulations, but they are going to be extra careful in this case.

Also, just in case you haven't already, might want to make sure that it is clearly disclosed in the "Safety" section of your listing and not just the regular text descriptions.

One thing that seemed to go a long way to making my guests more comfortable is that I bought indoor cameras that can swivel toward the wall AND I turn them towards the wall before guests arrive before turning them off.  It still doesn't satisfy everybody and there are still some guests that get out ladders to unplug the cameras (and forgot to plug back in!)

Mark116
Level 10
Jersey City, NJ

@Michael5689  I must be missing something, what is the purpose of having indoor cameras that are turned off and turned toward the wall? 

 

Indoor cameras are firstly much more of a privacy issue than outside cameras, but if you are facing cameras toward the wall and turning them off, why even have them?  The reason for having external cameras is to prevent extra guests, loud and disturbing activity outside and if/when that happens to have video evidence to prove it.

Michael5689
Level 10
Mountain View, CA

It's a vacation rental hours away from our main home and I don't have a good house manager to take care of the place. I've diagnosed leaks before, determined if a smoke alarm called for the fire company and allowed service people into the home remotely when it's vacant.  I turn them back on and swivel back around when people are not renting.  They are on home automation and their own camera controlled on/off switches so guests are doubly protected if they end of turning the camera on by mistake.

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