161205-Seasonal_Q3-Ivy-0232.jpg

 

Hey everyone!

 

As time goes by and society changes and evolves, so does the behaviour and the needs of guests. The experience you provided 10 years ago may not necessarily be as relevant today. Guests may be travelling for different reasons than they used to, or expect different amenities or service. On the platform guests may be looking at listings differently as well, for example which pictures and in which order, or the information that’s in your listing.

 

There is, however, also a case to be made for sticking with what you know. You can gather more insight into what guests think of the experience you provide, and use your time to tweak and perfect that which you already know how to do well.

 

Do you keep up with the guest experience? Do you update your listing frequently or not at all, and how do you make sure the experience for guests both during booking and during their stay is still relevant?

 

I’m looking forward to reading your thoughts in the comments!

Sybe

20 Replies

Re: Do you keep up with the guest experience?

in
Eugene, OR
Level 2

I'm in my 9th year as an Airbnb SuperHost.  I come from 30+ years in corporate America in business development, marketing and hi-cap sales.

My guest experience program:

--immediately call guest upon new booking and thank them & field any questions about the property

--1 week before arrival send a personal "Welcome email" with more info about amenities, door code and features

--"meet & greet" and give a tour of the property at time of arrival

--day after arrival, check with guests how everything is and ask if we can do or provide anything more

--day of check out, check with guests,  thank them for staying and welcome them back as their travels bring them back

Re: Do you keep up with the guest experience?

in
London, United Kingdom
Level 5

HI, I've been a host for ages, just letting out a room in the flat where I  live.  Most guests are here to visit London, and so just need a comfortable, safe and welcoming place to stay, after siteseeing all day.  I ask guests to tell me why they are coming to London before they make the booking, so that I can work out what their stay will be like and if the room will be suitable for them. If they go ahead with the booking, I contact them a week before their arrival with lots of information about staying here, reminding them that they are staying in a room in a flat where I will be as well. I always meet them, show them around, show them how the keys work and where everything is. I try to think of their stay as if friends are coming to stay with me, and treat the guests in that way. I've been doing long enough to work out what sort of people they are when they arrive, and what problems might arise so that I can provide solutions before the problems arise.  
Since Covid, when I lost my Superhost status, I have been more careful about taking bookings as in my outside life, I mix with lots of vulnerable people. I was also annoyed with Airbnb about losing my status due to reasons outside of my control, and also when they had that ridiculous suggestion in 2020 that we go out to all all previous guests and ask for money because hosts were losing money (while thousands of people around us were dying!)  Before Covid, I used to have bookings for almost every weekend, but now I am not so keen to have short term guests.  Now I am looking for bookings for 5 days or more, which has been working out well. It's nice to be back into Airbnb, meeting people from around the world and reading the forum again

Re: Do you keep up with the guest experience?

Online Community Manager in
London, United Kingdom
Online Community Manager

@Eileen0 It's great to have you back as well! 😃 What was the reason you decided to go for longer stays instead?


Can’t find what you’re searching for?
Click start a conversation to ask the Airbnb Community! 


Re: Do you keep up with the guest experience?

in
Huntington Beach, CA
Level 2

Summers in our area are very busy and most activities require a reservation. So I usually check with guests a week before they arrive to ask if there’s anything special they want to plan or a favorite restaurant/food they like. Sometimes I offer to make a dinner reservation if no deposit is required.  It’s easy to take a peek and see what’s available online, then make the reservation with my account (opentable, yelp, etc.) and change the name later.  So far all eateries I’ve booked this way are understanding about the

change and appreciate the business. Taking time to set up a comprehensive online Airbnb guidebook Is also helpful and worth the extra effort since I don’t have to answer individual questions about area attractions and activities. I simply share my guidebook  link when a stay is booked. To help guests think ahead, make reservations, pack accordingly and get excited about their trip 

Re: Do you keep up with the guest experience?

in
Wisconsin, United States
Level 2

Hello Airbnb Community, I have an Airbnb vacation rental cottage in Door County Wisconsin.  I update my listing frequently.  When I had an issue with too many vehicles marking at my rental cottage, I added verbiage to my listing in three different places. When a guest parked in the neighbor's driveway, I added verbiage about that in three different places.  When I had an issue with a guest booking the rental, and when we told him we had limited parking clearly listed three times on the site he asked if I would just cancel the booking, which I did not do, and he was too late to do.  We ended up working out a parking resolution, but I added verbiage in my listing about that after that issue in three different places.  Sunrise Cottage is in a four-season location, so I have information on all four seasons but modify the description to have relevant information pertaining to the current season and events in the area for that time.  As bookings fill in the calendar, I update the description so I'm not advertising a weekend that is not available.  I change the Cover photo and pictures to reflect the current or upcoming season.  I recently added a couple pictures guests sent me to share.  I have a "Guest Journal" that 90% of guests write in, it is left at the cottage so all guests can read and add to it.  Both guests and I get great information on what they did and what they liked during their visit.  I'm going to do a "Guest Favorites" soon and add that to my description.  I ask guests to let me know if they are bringing a boat (cottage is on the water) or if they are brining small children so I can accommodate them with information on boating in the area or getting the baby playpen and highchair out.  The more I know about the guest without being nosey the better I can make their visit more personal.  Some share that it is a visit for their anniversary, and I will leave a Happy Anniversary card and or flowers for them.  I truly enjoy hosting Sunrise Cottage.  https://airbnb.com/h/sunrise-cottage.IMG_8534.jpg

Re: Do you keep up with the guest experience?

in
United Kingdom
Level 2

I've just started out and I'm making changes to my 'room in house' listing description, rules, and other information almost daily, learning from experience.

The one thing I dislike is the disabilities and service animals policy. My guest room is on the upper floor and I have a reactive, un-spayed dog. But according to AirBnB policy, I wouldn't be able to refuse someone in a wheelchair or accompanied by a guide dog, as it would be discriminatory. Yet they wouldn't be able to reach the bedroom and my dog would be in distress, and potentially become impregnated.

Hopefully this won't happen, as I make it clear in my listing where the room is located and that I have a female dog, but it could.

This 'rule' should be flexible according to the host's circumstances.

I also totally agree about guest reviews when filled with lies. I had a couple recently who were super happy, full of praise and very grateful, only to leave a 3* review based on lies. So unfair.

Join the conversation