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Hello everyone, 

 

One of the key roles of lighting in an interior setting is probably functionality. There are many types of lights, and most likely the lighting one picks needs to suit a purpose, whether that’s to act as decoration, create an atmosphere, or simply provide ample brightness. Some of you might also pay particular attention to how energy hungry a lighting fixture is (being environmentally-conscious here). 

 

Thinking about desks and other work areas, you might for example lean towards bright, task-specific lighting whereas in a cosy living room, you might explore more warm and atmospheric options … there’s a lot to consider!

 

How important is lighting to you? 💡

 

What do you look for when choosing the right lighting for your home? 

 

Feel free to share photos of your designs!

 

Quincy

34 Replies

Re: How important is lighting to you?

in
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Level 10

@Quincy 

Lampshades is a must.
One on each side of the double bed.
If the listing has a lounge/living-room, at least one lampshade.

Re: How important is lighting to you?

Online Community Manager in
London, United Kingdom
Online Community Manager

What's your set-up @J-Renato0? Do you have any photos to share? 😃

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Re: How important is lighting to you?

in
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Level 10

@Quincy  Here you are ! 🙂

lampshades.JPG

Re: How important is lighting to you?

Online Community Manager in
London, United Kingdom
Online Community Manager

Very nice @J-Renato0! 😃

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Re: How important is lighting to you?

in
Balearic Islands, Spain
Level 10

A few tips about lighting. 

 

First, lighting design is divided into two distinct groups: 

 

1) Functional lighting

The purpose of functional lighting is to light an area or object, such as workspace, counter tops, general room lighting, etc.. In most cases, the lamp itself is not the purpose of the fixture, it is to light up another object. 

 

2) Ornamental lighting. 

This would include things like chandeliers, table or floor lamps or other artworks where the lamp itself is the focus, not the lighting it produces. 

 

Ornamental lighting, generally speaking, won't do a great job of lighting an object, such as a dining table or artworks on the wall or a counter top. Those things are best achieved by employing functional lighting designed for that. 

 

One example of this is using a chandelier alone to light a dining table (I love chandeliers, but apply them properly). It looks great, but doesn't do a great job of lighting the table. Adding a few overhead spotlights aimed at the table will better achieve the result of adequate table lighting, in addition to the chandelier. 

 

And in the (highly likely) case where the (functional) lamp used to light an object is overhead, or above the object to be lit, it's always best to conceal the lamp itself, as the light from it can shine in your eyes and distract from the function of lighting the intended object. A good example of this is recessed lighting. You don't see the light from the lamp itself, you only see the object it is lighting up. And that tends to be very pleasing, particularly for photos. 

 

And of course, dimmers for general room lighting are a godsend. You don't always want bright lighting, especially in a  dining or living area.  Kitchens generally don't need dimmers. You either want light (and it should light all surfaces well) or you don't want it on. It need not be more complicated than that. Same is true with bathrooms. 

 

Control:

 

Beyond the lighting itself, keeping control of it in a very simple manner has some big advantages, especially for guests unfamiliar with the environment. 

 

For example I've seen places which have a separate switch for every light. This will cause confusion to many guests, because they either can't find the switch for the light they want, or they can't be bothered to shut them off when they leave or go to bed. 

 

So, guests will find that one switch that turns on or off the dining room (for example) makes it all very simple and comfortable. You can (should) have multiple switches in multiple convenient locations (e.g., in the room and another by the main entrance) but they all should do the same thing; On or off the entire area they control. Separate dimmers facilitate setting the desired ambiance, but one switch should turn it all on or off. And they're much more likely to turn them off if it's that convenient. 

 

Colour temperature:

 

One of the great things about LED lighting is the ability to choose colour temperature. "Warm" or "cold" light. This is also important.

 

My rule is that living areas such as dining, lounges, and bedrooms should use warm light (2500-3500 kelvin). It feels soft and comfortable.

 

Workplaces, such as Kitchens and bathrooms should use cooler, more "clinical" light (3700-4500 Kelvin) as this gives the impression of cleanliness and is generally better for workspaces. 

 

It's all very psychological, but a cleverly lit space will leave guests with the impression that your space not only "just feels good", but is stylish as well. And it will also show in your photos! 

 

Good luck and happy hosting! 

 

/tuppence

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