Breakfasts - who does this and what do you offer?

Breakfasts - who does this and what do you offer?

 

Hello lovely people!

 

Im deciding to host a gourmet breakfast any suggestions and who else does this and what do you offer?  

13 Replies 13
Robin4
Level 10
Mount Barker, Australia

@Melissa1967 

Hi Melissa, in most jurisdictions (legally) food is a difficult issue to get involved with.

 

Here in Australia, as an invited friend/dinner guest you can serve anything you like. But as a host who is being paid by a guest for a service, unless you have a council approved food handling licence you are only permitted to provide perishable food items that are in the manufacturers approved sealed packaging.

In other words the manufacturer is accepting responsibility of the items provided, but once they are opened and tampered with, the manufacturer no longer has a legal obligation to guarantee the integrity/quality/suitability of those items in any subsequent health issue.

I assure you I know precisely where I stand on this issue, I have had lengthy discussions with my local council health inspector! I know exactly what I can provide and what I am not permitted to!

 

There are packaging exceptions such as eggs! The law considers an undamaged eggshell to be a guarantee of the integrity of the contents .

 

I am operating entirely within the law if I offer a bowl of eggs and a manufacturers sealed package of bacon for the guest to do whatever they like with. I am not allowed to fry up some eggs, put in a few jazzy condiments and cook a few rashers from a stored, previously opened 1 Kg pack of bacon rashers.

By doing so I have destroyed the manufacturers approved food handling licence conditions! I am not allowed to put out a jug of milk.....it must be in a sealed container with the manufacturers use by date clearly stamped.

 

The same can be said for the supply of alcohol!  As nice a gesture as it may seem,  by putting a bottle of bubbles in the fridge, or a nice red wine with a couple of glasses on the table, it can be successfully argued in a court of law that you are being paid for this guests stay, just as a hotel owner is when a patron walks through the door to have a drink or two, and as such the supply of alcohol is illegal without an appropriate liquor licence......it can be argued that it is a part of the paid rental agreement.

 

Having said that I have this arrangement with a local liquor store, when a carton of beer gets dropped and a can or two is damaged I get the carton for no charge so, the argument is......if I have not bought it I am simply passing it on for no profit, it does not form part of the rental agreement, it is a gift!

 

Melissa, I provide heaps of condiments for my guests.......They get eggs and bacon in the fridge with all the required utensils to cook it, they get fruit juice, milk, tea, coffee,  butter, bread and spreads.....but all in manufacturers sealed packaging! Every guest gets a cheese plate, including one nighters......

Screenshot_2021-04-13-14-46-23-68.png

 

But when the guest walks in this is the way they receive it......

 

IMG20200114163740.jpg

 

all perishables are in sealed packaging!

 

I would check very carefully with your local council authority as to what you can provide in the way of food, if they can see that you are genuine they might give you a bit of leeway, but if there is an issue with something you have provided that they know nothing about, they have the capacity to shut you down.

So tread carefully!

All the best Melissa!

 

Cheers.........Rob

 

Laurelle3
Level 10
Huskisson, Australia

@Melissa1967 As @Gillian166 said in Australia we have government rules relating to "Food handling and Safety" we have completed this certificate because we have used it in Scouting. If you supply bed and breakfast you have to have a licence and be checked out by the council Health and building service.

I provide a hamper basket which has enough for a light breakfast and cooked breakfast. We personally don't cook the food and all the food is pre packaged. 

When we started using Airbnb in 2014 as a guest I always chose hosts that supplied breakfast most times it was tea, coffee, juice, cereal and toast and jams. But times have changed since then.

Helen3
Level 10
Bristol, United Kingdom

It would really depend on where you live @Melissa1967 

 

Firstly check that you are allowed to offer food in your area and what licensing you may need.

 

 

Gillian166
Level 10
Hay Valley, Australia

I don't do this as we have strict food rules in Australia, plus i don't want to... haha. but brekky is my fave meal and i've got plenty of ideas for a gourmet breakfast. I would base any offering around local and seasonal foods, hard to see where you are as your profile is empty. 

Sudsrung0
Level 10
Rawai, Thailand

@Gillian166 

 

We go out at least once a week for a full English Breakfast, 

Gillian166
Level 10
Hay Valley, Australia

@Sudsrung0  hmm, I hope by "english" you mean "western". Next time look for an Australian brekky, our cafe scene here for brekky is incredible. 😋
Stocksy_comp_watermarked_1427762.jpgStocksy_comp_watermarked_1332504.jpg


Sudsrung0
Level 10
Rawai, Thailand

@Gillian166 

Nah, this is more like it, Heart attack stuff hahahah

 

 

 

10365767_593331247500252_7515659424336456509_n.jpg

 

Gillian166
Level 10
Hay Valley, Australia

@Sudsrung0  Yes that is an English breakfast. 

Jenny
Community Manager
Community Manager
Galashiels, United Kingdom

Wow @Gillian166 - now THAT'S a brekky!

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Sudsrung0
Level 10
Rawai, Thailand

@Melissa1967 

 

I would say before you go any further check out your local laws regarding opening your kitchen you could end up in big trouble and get shut down, Many countries have a Food Hygiene laws 

Then check your insurance are you covered against a claim for food poisoning? 

Gwen386
Level 10
Lusby, MD

Hi, is this an experience? Do you have a license to serve food?

Yes as part of the package.

No I don’t have a license. 

Sudsrung0
Level 10
Rawai, Thailand

@Melissa1967 

 

I remember years ago a guy on Airbnb selling alcohol to his guest somebody reported him was similar he didnt have a license 

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