Seoul Mates: A couple’s journey from the corporate world to the hospitality business

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Hojin Chang and his wife Sarah needed a break from the daily grind. It was 2014, and both had jobs at the same Seoul-based electronics manufacturing firm. He worked in sales; she was responsible for meeting with investors and important clients. They were the kind of jobs young professionals anywhere would relish. But the stress and long hours were wearing them down.

 

“We went to the company in the early morning and got back late at night,” Hojin says. That left no time for the couple to spend time with each other. “We quit our jobs and went on our world tour,” he adds.

 

Hojin (third from left), along with his House of Sarah staff, offers personalized service at 20 Airbnbs in SeoulHojin (third from left), along with his House of Sarah staff, offers personalized service at 20 Airbnbs in SeoulA world tour offers lessons in hospitality
“World tour” is a fitting description for the couple’s odyssey: They traveled 430 days, visiting 30 countries across five continents. Almost everywhere they went, they stayed in Airbnb spaces. The experience taught them a lot about the importance of human connection in hospitality. “We met so many hosts that were so wonderful,” Hojin says.

 

One of the highlights of the trip was a lengthy stay in El Calafate, a small town in the Argentinian Patagonia that serves as a gateway to some of the world’s most spectacular glaciers. It’s there that they got a chance to experience firsthand the other side of the hospitality equation—and began to think of themselves not just as guests to be pampered, but also as potential hosts.

 

They arrived at the remote town with the idea of passing through quickly, but they ended up bonding with a Japanese-Korean couple who ran the Fuji Guest House, where they were staying. As it turned out, the Fuji owners were looking for extra help. Curious about the opportunity, Hojin and Sarah volunteered. Over the next two weeks, they learned about making beds, cleaning, managing schedules, and other basics of the hospitality business. “We wanted to have experience with that kind of job,” Hojin says.

 

We quit our jobs and went on our world tour. We met so many hosts that were so wonderful.” —Hojin Chang, Host

 

Searching for a new lifestyle
The trip helped to cement their bond. It also made one thing clear: They didn’t want to jump back into the rat race. They wanted to start a family, and the pressures of corporate jobs wouldn’t allow them to be the kind of parents they hoped to be.

 

That’s when opportunity came knocking. The couple heard that Airbnb, which was seeking to expand its footprint in Seoul, was holding a contest. Winners would receive the company’s help to set up a room in their house to host potential guests. Hojin and Sarah were among the 3,000 who entered and among the four who were selected. “They came and made a room for guests in the house,” Hojin says. “At that time, I knew I had a good chance to start [hosting on] Airbnb.”

Soulmates 2.jpg

 

They transformed a once-drab space into a well-lit, modern, and inviting guest room, and began earning some money without having to resume hectic professional lives. They enjoyed hosting, especially their interactions with guests, which reminded them of their globe-trotting days.

 

Hobby turns into an occupation
But once Sarah learned she was pregnant, the little extra money wasn’t enough. They had to step it up or find something else to do. That’s when Hojin decided to create the House of Sarah, a company that would offer hospitality and management skills to other property owners who were seeking to benefit from the growing popularity of Airbnb.

 

Four months after hosting for the first time in their home, the couple found an older but otherwise perfect property. It was ideally located for travelers who wanted to be close to all that Seoul has to offer, and Hojin convinced the owner to let him spruce up the place to make it more hospitable. Today the House of Sarah oversees 20 properties, giving their owners a worry-free way to share their homes. It employs a staff of four—two managers and two maintenance workers—in addition to Hojin.

 

The lessons they learned at the Fuji Guest House remain central to much of what they do in Seoul. It’s there, Hojin says, that they understood why attention to detail is so important in hospitality. When guests are so far from their homes, small things that make them feel cared for really matter.

Soulmates 3.jpg

 

Bringing a personal touch to hosting
“We understand how important accommodations are to travelers, so we focus on safety and cleanliness,” says Hojin. “I also want to make the same kind of good guest house [as Fuji] for our Airbnb guests.” With Seoul as something of an Asian crossroads, that often means helping guests from China, Malaysia, or Japan with language and cultural barriers. Hojin makes sure guests know where to get foods that will make them feel at home and where to catch the latest K-Pop sensation.

 

“When I meet guests the first day, we explain about the unit and the house and how to use everything,” Hoin says. “But at this time, always, we say ‘If you want to order some deep fried chicken or Chinese food, we can help you, don’t worry!’”

 

Four years after their globe-trotting adventure, Hojin and Sarah say they have found the balance they sought when they left their jobs. The House of Sarah gives them the opportunity to spend ample time together and with their son, who is now a toddler. As the business grows, they remain intent on replicating the hospitality they experienced in Patagonia. Whenever a guest contacts them about something they need, Hojin says, “We help them with pleasure, because we can imagine ourselves in that traveler’s position.”

 

Want to learn more about professional hosting with Airbnb? Click here

Labels (2)
19 Replies

Re: Seoul Mates: A couple’s journey from the corporate world to the hospitality business

in
Auckland, New Zealand
Level 10

Thanks @Airbnb for sharing Hojin Chang and his wife Sarah's story

 

https://www.airbnb.co.nz/users/show/99583591?_set_bev_on_new_domain=1579072544_YjhjMGQxZjIzZTlm

 

Just wondering if they have a Tag on here to include them in responses to there story?

 

Thanks in Advance

Re: Seoul Mates: A couple’s journey from the corporate world to the hospitality business

in
PMB, ZA
Level 1

Thank you. We know so clearly that the personal host touch is vitally important. 

Re: Seoul Mates: A couple’s journey from the corporate world to the hospitality business

in
West Ballina, Australia
Level 7

It is amazing to learn from our travels and be inspired by the many hosts all over the world.

In my view, its the only way to travel, meet people and get to live like locals while growing friendships worldwide ... over the years I have kept in touch with our guests and how wonderful to see them return with a new baby or see how the baby has grown and most of all how our lives have unfolded.

Re: Seoul Mates: A couple’s journey from the corporate world to the hospitality business

in
Paris, FR
Level 1

Amazing story. Hospitality is a trend in the world now. There is a unlimited income. 

Re: Seoul Mates: A couple’s journey from the corporate world to the hospitality business

in
JM
Level 2

This is commendable  to hear from other host about hospitality.Beverley Salmon level 2 host

Re: Seoul Mates: A couple’s journey from the corporate world to the hospitality business

in
Ithaca, NY
Level 2

As a traveller, I look for a place that reflects the culture of the community I am visiting.  These places look so bland they could be anywhere in the world, straight out of a store. I want to see grandma's quilt, jam from the garden, framed photos of local spots of interest, tourist literature spilling off the bookshelf indicating a hosts enthusiasm for their hometown. I want to meet your dog and read a book from your shelf. This room you picture says, don't tarry,,, quick quick in and out, nothing memorable here. 

Re: Seoul Mates: A couple’s journey from the corporate world to the hospitality business

in
Cambridge, MD
Level 1

I agree that the personal touch is Key. As a host I try to find out things about my guests prior to arrival so to assist in helping them feel comfortable in my home. Most of my guests are triathletes, so I know that when I prepare snacks for them what they can and cannot eat prior to a race. I also make sure that all the linens I use are only for Airbnb  guests and are freshly laundered. Then I have a little gift bag set on their bed with a welcome note. Morning will find fresh muffins  or scones and fresh fruit to start their day if desired.

Re: Seoul Mates: A couple’s journey from the corporate world to the hospitality business

in
Seoul, South Korea
Level 10

They are hosting in Seoul, where most of guests they get (from nearby geographic locations) prefer(and willing to pay more) for that bland look. 

As they are doing this for their main source of income, I do understand why they set up things that way it is.

Re: Seoul Mates: A couple’s journey from the corporate world to the hospitality business

in
Dallas, TX
Level 1

Some great ideas! I do feel that rentals are not a one-size-fits-all, however. We need to take into consideration the demographics of our guests, our location, and the "why".  In my situation, we offer a bedroom in our home (as a suite with full bathroom and living room) in Dallas, TX, in a gated community.  We are conveniently located just off a major highway that is between the airport and the city center. Due to our location our guests tend to be people traveling for business, not tourists who prefer being somewhere more geographically interesting. They are up and out very early each morning then return somewhat late in the day/night. Although our room is decorated with a  poster of Texas and has some magazines of the state and city, we don't really have a need to create a "story" or an immersion into the local culture.  What our guests want is a convenient location, cleanliness, security and friendly hosts. And, we have all of that in spades 🙂      Business Rule #1: Know Your Customer

Re: Seoul Mates: A couple’s journey from the corporate world to the hospitality business

in
Johannesburg, ZA
Level 1

Insightful 

Re: Seoul Mates: A couple’s journey from the corporate world to the hospitality business

in
Auckland, New Zealand
Level 4

A great ethic in personal touch is the main ingredient. 

Re: Seoul Mates: A couple’s journey from the corporate world to the hospitality business

in
West Ballina, Australia
Level 7

absolutely agree and it allows the host to appreciate what they bring to others

Re: Seoul Mates: A couple’s journey from the corporate world to the hospitality business

in
СПБ, Russia
Level 10

It's a nice pink and fluffy story.

 

Let's face reality though, Airbnb threw co-hosts under the bus.

Re: Seoul Mates: A couple’s journey from the corporate world to the hospitality business

in
Cape Town, South Africa
Level 1

An interesting story and very helpful, thank you!

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