For the first time I used Airbnb with such an excitement, but only ended up being greeted with the security cameras installed in the living room without us knowing at the time of the reservation. If we knew,, we would have not made the reservation .... What do other hosts think it's appropriate way to notify the guest? 

As a guest, it would have been fair to us to acknowledge the presence of the cameras when we are searching options . 

 

95 Replies

Re: Security camera

in
Haverhill, MA
Level 2

So it’s now 2020... has Airbnb added a spot to tell guests about a security camera? We have just 1 facing the driveway to monitor not only security, but the weather as well being in NH. How do You other hosts write it in your listing? Where in your listing? Have you noticed any decrease in bookings because of it? Thanks!

Re: Security camera

in
Cardedeu, Spain
Level 1

hi, where do I edit this information about having alarm/security cameras in my listing? 

Re: Security camera

in
Munnsville, NY
Level 10

I know lots of folks who have cameras on their homes and as long as everyone that lives there knows, its probably legal.  Cameras do come with consequences for those who deploy them, especially businesses.  Some are positive, others can be or are felonious in certain circumstances. 

 

I believe the first thing to consider is actually the rights of your guests, they may vary according to locality, state and country of residence.  In most places, when a guest rents a space that provides a reasonable expectation of privacy, we are forbidden from invading that without permission or reasonable provocation (watching them on hidden cameras is not reasonable).   

 

The next is responsibility for placement and monitoring of visible camera installations as a business.  In many localities, Installing a camera comes with further liability to monitor it at all times and respond to emergencies if they arise.  If you don't, you could be held responsible for injuries or crimes that were visible on that device.   

 

Lastly and it should probably be first and last, peeping is for perves!  If you peep, you should go to jail and never ever be allowed to host again.  Nuff said, stay well, JR

Re: Security camera

in
Kendal, United Kingdom
Level 10

I've looked into security cameras on several occasions for the reason that if guests break house rules, then, you need evidence to back up any claim you have against them. Understand this: Guests are not under surveillance by the use of CCTV cameras, the cameras are there because Airbnb require Hosts to provide evidence of any damages, over occupancy, unregistered visitors, altercations, claims or whatever complaint may be brought. CCTV is a good way to provide this.

 

This being said, there are rules:

 

It's absolutely crucial info for every host who has either interior or exterior cameras to be fully aware of, as Airbnb can - and regularly do - suspend/delist hosts if a scamming/disgruntled guest complains about the cameras, and the host hasn't disclosed them in all the right places.

 

Regardless of personal opinions on whether or not hosts should have cameras indoors, they are permitted by Airbnb, as long as they're not in bathrooms and sleeping spaces. (personally, I'd never stay in a place with indoor cams, but can see where they'd maybe be necessary in a shared home environment where a host is not on site).

 

All cameras of any type must be disclosed, even if turned off/not operational (including cameras on computer monitors, nanny cams, baby monitors etc).

 

All it takes is one complaint from a vengeful guest about any undisclosed monitoring/surveillance device, and the host is toast.

 

In the app, go to: Booking Settings > House Rules > Details Guests Must Know About Your Home > Surveillance or Recording Devices on Property. Slide the button to the On/Yes position.

 

Then: "Describe any device that records or sends video or audio, or still images. Specify each device's location and whether it will be on or off."

 

This message will then appear in a pop-up box that the guest agrees to accept in order to complete the booking (like the House Rules). 

 

This provides what Airbnb considers sufficient disclosure at the time of booking, per their TOS, without having to wonder if a guest read the listing description in its entirety to catch it.

 

This specific procedure is mandatory. Failure to use the Surveillance button for disclosure can get you delisted. It is still a good idea to include surveillance information in your written listing description, written House Rules, listing photos, and any messaging with the guest.

 

It's also mandatory to notify any existing future reservations of the fact that you added a camera, and its location.

 

Existing reservations can choose to cancel for free because if this change in terms post-booking. But you can mitigate their option to cancel by offering to remove the cameras for their stay. I would photograph or film yourself doing so, for the purpose of documenting that you did.

 

 

Re: Security camera

in
South Korea
Level 10

Henry and I considered (ultimately decided not to though) installing a camera in our shared kitchen after a guest left food cooking on our gas stove then stepped away into the private guest bedroom to take a call and burned her dinner. Thank god it was just some smoke.... no damage or flames. Same guest also kept putting metal utensils in the microwave with her plate of food which is another safety hazard. 

 

While I am wary of indoor cameras..... I also understand WHY in some cases it may be necessary. 

 

A camera is literally the only way to secure proof that the clueless idiot guest is the one responsible for starting a fire in the kitchen.... or the one that left windows  and front door wide open all day while the house was empty. 

 

And of course anywhere you have cameras you need to make sure everyone is aware of its presence. For indoor cameras I think to some extent I'd be okay with a few facing entry points, the kitchen stove/oven area and stairs. 

Re: Security camera

in
Whitby, Canada
Level 2

Hi Everyone,

A question if that's alright.  Been a Super host with Airbnb for about 3 years.  We recently sold and bought another cottage in another location, perhaps not as sought after and a bit further north from the GTA.  However, the cottage itself  is amazing and does not compare to the older one.  July and August booked up fairly quickly but we are finding that June really hasn't moved, where as the older cottage booked up fairly quickly right to Thanksgiving weekend before we had to close it down for the winter.  People seem to be viewing our new one but no further bookings.  In this particular cottage there are security cameras outside only and I can't help but to wonder if this is a deterrent.  Any thoughts?

Thanks, I appreciate your opinion.

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