Christmas decorations

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Flavia202
Level 10
Kingston, Jamaica

Christmas decorations

Hello hosts - season's greetings, happy holidays!
Do you put Christmas decorations in your listing? I usually put some bright & sparkly baubles in a large bowl and use it a as centre-piece on the dining table & a smaller version in the living room. I think it's a nice touch for guests who celebrate the Season and the stuff is small enough for guests to put away (e.g., in a draw) if they don't like it.
 
What do you do?  Some decorations- a little, a lot?  None? Love to see pics so please share.
 
Wishing you all a safe, healthy and prosperous 2022!
1 Best Answer
Gillian166
Level 10
Hay Valley, Australia

just rebooting this topic because this is our 2nd xmas hosting and we have a family booked into the cottage. Last year we had a single man doing covid QT, what a different year it is!  I'm thinking at the least we will do a Xmas tree and probably a wreath on the door and xmas lights, but I don't really see fairy lights as "xmas" haha, we have quite a lot of fairy lights about the place. I also buy xmas tea towels (usually animal or botanical themed stuff to go with our styling, there's been a great shift in the past years to make Xmas decor more appropriate to our landscape so there's more things with native flowers and plants, and cockatoos and other animals etc) and I don't do anything religious, just festive.  

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Sheila646
Level 6
Elizabeth, CO

We love, love Christmas! This is us keeping the decorations toned down. LOL! 

https://fb.watch/h5foa2XzQ7/

We know we have a family coming in to celebrate Christmas, so they are okay this year.

If someone objected or gave some indication they don't celebrate Christmas, we would probably take out the tree, but the other pagan greenery and lights would stay. 

We do get guests for other religious holidays during the year. When I know that is going on I do a little research to figure out if there is something in particular they need. For instance we don't allow candles, but some religious observances include candle lighting or candle vigils, so we make an exception and provide candles, holders, and trays that will make it safer. 

Farm Diva
Flavia202
Level 10
Kingston, Jamaica

Hi @Sheila646 , sounds good. I don't allow candles as well and so far I've not had any objections.

ARC-Print0
Level 2
California City, CA

I just use seasonal decorations to polish up my farm house. In this way, the space is enough brightened to feel unique, it is compatible with all or no religions, and I only have to change it out four times a year. I currently have  a couple winter gnomes, a snowman, and a snow welcome flower.

ARC Print
Gillian166
Level 10
Hay Valley, Australia

just rebooting this topic because this is our 2nd xmas hosting and we have a family booked into the cottage. Last year we had a single man doing covid QT, what a different year it is!  I'm thinking at the least we will do a Xmas tree and probably a wreath on the door and xmas lights, but I don't really see fairy lights as "xmas" haha, we have quite a lot of fairy lights about the place. I also buy xmas tea towels (usually animal or botanical themed stuff to go with our styling, there's been a great shift in the past years to make Xmas decor more appropriate to our landscape so there's more things with native flowers and plants, and cockatoos and other animals etc) and I don't do anything religious, just festive.  

Flavia202
Level 10
Kingston, Jamaica

It's great to be back to 'normal' @Gillian166!

I like your idea of the Xmas towels with the differentl themes. Nice touch!

Gillian166
Level 10
Hay Valley, Australia

@Flavia202  I will confess I went to tk maxx the other day and bought some xmas decor... despite my best intentions I just can't resist the American stuff, it's so good. I even got hand soap + lotion in a xmas theme. 🎅🏼

 

Jennifer2670
Level 4
Winston-Salem, NC

I only decorate my place in the mountains with seasonal decorations. That way it brightens up the place enough to make it different, it fits with all/no religions,  and I only have to switch it out 4x a year.  Right now I've got a winter welcome wreath, a few winter gnomes, a snowman,  some winter place decor,  and a beautiful set of wooden deer.

John5097
Level 10
Charleston, SC

@Flavia202 

I have some outside porch decorations. And a small cypress plant and reef on the door for guest apartment. I think it makes it more cheerful. I grew up with best friends who weren't Christian but we all liked to exchange gifts and all take part in the holiday. 

You can see the little tree and flowers on the table. I also have some cypress trees in the yard so cut those. Also got a red lantern that has orniments inside but its so red that I don't like it and think I'm going to take it out. I got one for my living space but just don't like it either. 

I have guest over Christmas and New Years. Both returning and book each year. The second one I noticed turned around a plant holder that said "Merry Christmas." But also asked if she could put the poinsettias on the coffee table because she liked them. 

IMG_1614 2.JPG


Inside the unit. I happened to have this pic from trying to figure out where to place mini split on next project but you can see the plants on the table in the corner. Can't take pics of reef on the door or the other lantern becuase its rented. 

66077597504__8F774236-69F6-4C61-9B07-839C01CF993B.JPG
 

Flavia202
Level 10
Kingston, Jamaica

Hi @John5097 . Thanks for sharing pics. I like your porch.  Lovely Christmas cheer!  I also like the little tree on your table.  Nice.

Re Poinsettias  - I get some for myself   (reds and whites) every year  because they so lift my spirits!

Huma0
Level 10
London, United Kingdom

@John5097 

 

I think your porch looks lovely. I have given up on poinsettias though. I find it depressing how quickly they die!

 

When my family first moved to the UK, we didn't celebrate Christmas. My brother and I were still toddlers so I don't really remember what we did on Christmas the first couple of years. However, once we started school, my parents decided we would celebrate Christmas even though it didn't represent their tradition/beliefs, because they felt that we as young children were missing out.

 

We have celebrated it ever since and I remember my mother getting very upset when I was 19 and turned up late (and already well fed) because I'd had a Xmas lunch with my boyfriend and flatmates. 

 

When I was about 13, I asked my mother to write a letter to my school to tell them I didn't want to go to assembly and sing hymns and pray, nor go to chapel, because I wasn't Christian. She agreed, but told me, "It's good to learn about other people's religions." I realise now she was right. No one should be forced to celebrate Christmas, or any other religious festival, but then no one should be forced not to celebrate it either.

John5097
Level 10
Charleston, SC

@Huma0 That is so interesting about growing up with your family during the holidays! Thanks for sharing. I think its been about inclusion of inclusion, and I can see how your mom might of thought you would have been missing out. 

I only decorated the porch for guest. I usually just liked to take a break from work and use holidays to do something on my own. My sister always invites me for her Christmas Eve party but she has so many friends that its the only time I see a lot of people which is a little awkward for me although perfectly normal for her as she has always had a lot of friends. 

 

I saw someone today at the grocery store that also has a dining area and someone said, just be happy no matter what you are doing or something like that. So true! And there is so much other stuff going on that i'm not compatibale. For example the county park has a light display that has over a million light bulbs. Its all these scenes of lights along all the roads in the park and people pay $10 just to drive through and none of them even get out of their cars, and there is a line of cars over a mile long just to get in the park. Its just to make money, which means that the majority of people who visit the county park never even get out of their cars! 

Coffee shops are also becoming drive through with long lines. So its often more about technology and transportation.  I agree,  that really nothing should be forced on anyone. Some parts of the world are more extreme. It should all be about making choices and being a good influence when one can. 

Elaine701
Level 10
Balearic Islands, Spain

Yes, we go all out. Decorations, tree, lights, seasonal place settings, candles, Stollen, Glühwein, bubbly... The works. Indoors and out. 

 

Every Christmas guest has loved it so far. No complaints. 

Flavia202
Level 10
Kingston, Jamaica

Cheers!

Mark116
Level 10
Jersey City, NJ

If I were staying in a foreign country where there was a major holiday that existed which was not part of my personal cultural tradition--far from being offended by any decorations or evidence of the holiday--I would be thrilled to get exposure and would see it as a learning opportunity.  

Lisa723
Level 10
Quilcene, WA

@Flavia202 we put a wreath on the outside of the house. Would not do more, as an assumption that everyone who matters celebrates Christmas can be very unwelcoming to those who don't.

Flavia202
Level 10
Kingston, Jamaica

So just a nod to Christmas then, @Lisa723.  Any thoughts about expecting guests to know that they're in a place that DOES celebrate Christmas and so should not be turned off by seeing such decorations in the listing? 

Lisa723
Level 10
Quilcene, WA

@Flavia202 what do you mean by "a place"? Obviously there are people who don't celebrate Christmas in every part of the world. If you mean your particular listing, if you don't always display religious iconography, but only at this particular season, you could of course alert any guests who book or request to book for stays during that time that they will find it.

Huma0
Level 10
London, United Kingdom

@Lisa723 

 

I am all for being sensitive to cultural differences, BUT...

 

I am not actually a Christian myself, and come from a muslim family. When my parents first moved to the UK, they had never celebrated Christmas and didn't see the point in doing so, as they viewed it as some other people's religious tradition.

 

However, that is really not the case here. Most traditions associated with Christmas have little to do with christianity. Rather, some are derived from earlier pagan traditions and many are more cultural than religious. Correct me if I am wrong, but there is nothing particularly Christian about a decorated tree or Santa in his red and white outfit.

 

So, I view any Christmas displays as something more cultural than religious and I have never had a single guest indicate that they are offended by them. Quite the opposite. People seem to love them and many, many absolutely expect it and are disappointed if they are not there.

 

That is quite different to telling people they need to go to midnight mass. No one is forced to participate in a religious festival, but they do get a chance to witness the traditions of the culture that they choose to visit during that holiday.

 

Do I celebrate Thanksgiving? No. Or Holy, or Ramadan? No. But I'm certainly not going to get offended if I visit a country where they do and expect the people in the place that I am visiting to adapt their culture for me.

 

Would you visit a very traditional muslim country and then tell people there that they should dress differently or not have the call to prayer because you don't believe in it and therefore that offends you?

Lisa723
Level 10
Quilcene, WA

@Huma0 you're certainly correct that many "Christmas" traditions predate Christmas and were simply appropriated by Christianity. And no, I wouldn't tell people in a traditionally muslim country (or any other country, or in my own country) how to dress etc.-- not sure how you made that leap.

 

In the US, Christmas is an omnipresent and completely over-the-top consumerist extravaganza having very little to do with religion. It is virtually impossible to escape it. I try to provide a neutral space for people looking for a getaway. I personally would not assume that all guests would be happy to find a Christmas tree or a creche in their space.

Huma0
Level 10
London, United Kingdom

@Lisa723 

 

That's fair enough, but I see that you list entire spaces, whereas mine is a shared listing, i.e. my own home, with possibly multiple guests staying. I guess that is a different scenario.

 

When going to stay in another country, especially in a homestay, I would never, ever expect the host to remove evidence of their culture, especially during an important holiday. I would consider that as insensitive behaviour on my part, and maybe that is how I made that leap. To me, that is not akin, but pretty close to, visiting another culture and expecting everyone else to act the same as where you come from/according to your beliefs, i.e. not dress differently or display anything different from your culture. I would not go to a Catholic or Orthodox country and expect them to do things Church of England style.

 

I completely understand though if you are providing only entire space listings that it makes more sense to keep things neutral.

 

My guests, on the other hand, would mostly be disappointed by a lack of Christmas tree and decorations. In fact, every guest I had staying with me shortly before they went up asked me if I was going to have a tree and when was I putting it up?

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