A new system to hold guests accountable

Sybe
Online Community Manager
Online Community Manager
London, United Kingdom

A new system to hold guests accountable

guest-accountability-XL copia.png

 

 

 

When you welcome guests to stay in your space, it’s essential that they respect your home, follow your house rules, communicate promptly if issues arise, and avoid creating a mess. So, we’re introducing ground rules for guests – a new set of enforceable standards that all guests must follow.

 

If a guest breaks ground rules, they get a warning the first time. If the issues persist, they'll be suspended and, if necessary, permanently removed from Airbnb.

 

You’ll still be able to write any additional house rules for guests to follow. And if a guest violates any of your house rules, we’ll support you if you need to cancel the reservation early. 

 

Read more about it on the Resource Center.

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74 Replies 74
JoandJoe0
Level 3
null

@Bubba-Lee0  What's that noise I hear? Ah, yes! Crickets! 

In other words, they're not going to do a bloody thing!

@Catherine-Powell  What say you? Care to opine?

Vanessa1669
Level 3
Claremore, OK

High five, great post and could not agree more. 

Vanessa Mullings
Joseph1753
Level 2
null

 Thought this was absolutely ridiculous to have guest haven’t spend the whole time he booked  and after checking out ,he posted a photo of bedbugs and asking for a full refund . It was a complete Airbnb scammer. Indeed 

Bubba-Lee0
Level 9
null


@Sybe wrote:

 

 

"If a guest breaks ground rules, they get a warning the first time. If the issues persist, they'll be suspended and, if necessary, permanently removed from Airbnb."

So explain this....

Host allows a guest to book. Guest books and throws a party. The Host, who has done nothing wrong,  reports guest for violating the No Party policy and the HOST gets suspended with no warning.

Meanwhile, here you are saying that if a guest breaks a rule, they get off with a warning and if they repeat their offense only then will they get suspended? 

Why don't hosts receive this same leniency? 

 

 


 

Michael1186
Level 3
Redmond, WA

I seems that the pre-booking message has been removed. I no longer see the option to set a pre-booking message. I first noticed yesterday that new bookings often didn't have any message from the guest. Why was this done?

Jennifer2672
Level 10
Sioux Falls, SD

I am really disappointed about that change. I've experimented with adding automated messaging that said the same thing. (We'd love to know more about what brings you here, please make sure your reservation is for the correct number of guests so we can properly stock and prepare the house.) So far, I've had one IB reservation with absolutely no communication whatsoever. 

Gillian166
Level 10
Hay Valley, Australia

@Jennifer2672  and so, it's time to stop giving guests 5* for communication. I have an easter egg in my house rules and lately zero guests have found it. i've been giving 4* as a standard now, and will drop to 3* or 2* if they didn't once use the message box. I used to not be like that, I thought an event-free stay was 5* but lately i've had a string of "bad" reviews (4* shouldn't be bad!) over silly things like: there's no TV (correct, didn't you read?), the weather was cold (correct, we warned you), there's no washing machine (correct, didn't you read?) and then get 3 or 4* for accuracy because something I never offered was missing! 😡

I predict that reviews are going to get worse overall as a result of all these changes. 

Christopher1112
Level 2
null

Hi Gillian, I have had very few bad guests over 3 yrs now, however, in the instances I did and the review whined about something like that I respond to their review indicating that the house manual and rule set they were obligated to read prior to booking ( platform terms of service) indicated X amenity was not included in my listing. I admonish them accordingly, then I contact the platform and have their review removed for breach of terms of service. I guard my superhost status and I am in a underserviced destination location- so far so good.

Gillian166
Level 10
Hay Valley, Australia

@Christopher1112  how do you get the review removed? I tried and they keep saying there's nothing wrong with the review. 

Drayton1
Level 2
Cincinnati, OH

LOL, I have been Super Host for over 3yrs. I was just demoted to regular host because of 3 an 4 star 🌟 ratings plus some that don't even leave a REVIEW. All nothing but lies 🤥 I even tried to have their reviews removed but Airbnb's RESPONCE to me was THEY ARE ENTITLED TO THERE OPINIONS! I totally GAVE UP NOW! IT'S ALL BS.

 

Huma0
Level 10
London, United Kingdom

@Michael1186 

 

It also appears that the filter to require guests to have verified ID has been removed and the requirement for 'recommended by other hosts' is now 'good track record', whatever that means. It says that guests who have RECENTLY broken Airbnb policies or a host's house rules will not be regarded as having a good track record. So, how often does their slate get wiped clean?

JoandJoe0
Level 3
null

@Huma0 I have read they have also removed the box to check, "Would you host this guest again?" [Y/N] 

I don't currently have any bookings (thank you Summer 2022 release) so I can't confirm if this is true or not. 

Can anyone confirm?

Huma0
Level 10
London, United Kingdom

@JoandJoe0 

 

I did not know that, but it doesn't surprise me. I could never find out exactly what Airbnb meant by 'recommended by other hosts', as the wording on this was extremely vague in any articles that mentioned it.

 

Some hosts, however, believed it mean that other hosts had selected 'would host again' for that guest, and that would explain why Airbnb has removed it from the review process, as that would make the question redundant.

 

On the other hand, other hosts believed that the question 'Would you host this guest again' bore no relation to whether or not they could book with future hosts, only whether or not they could IB with you. So what does that mean? Does it mean that we can no longer prevent a problematic guest from re-booking with us if we use IB, unless we block them (meaning we have to report them as 'being offensive').

Emilie
Online Community Manager
Online Community Manager
London, United Kingdom

Hi @Michael1186  & @Huma0,

 

We've shared more details on Airbnb's update to instant book settings in this post, which I thought you might be interested in! If you have any more comments or questions on this after, you can let us know in the discussion:

 

https://community.withairbnb.com/t5/Airbnb-updates/Details-on-Airbnb-s-update-to-instant-book-settin...

 

Thanks!

 

Emilie

 

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Huma0
Level 10
London, United Kingdom

@Emilie 

 

There is an awful lot here that is problematic, as I've already mentioned in other posts.

 

For starters, changing the IB booking settings without informing hosts in advance is shameful and unethical quite frankly. A lot of hosts only used IB because those settings were available. In fact, Airbnb have used those settings as a tool to convince hosts to do so. How can they just snatch it away without a word of warning? Why must it take hosts here on the CC to inform others? I wonder how many hosts are still out there blissfully unaware of this, like sitting ducks...

 

As for the verification process is worded in such a vague way as to be almost meaningless.

 

"Some Hosts only take bookings from guests with verified identity." However, it then goes on to say "This may include a confirmed government ID," and then specifies as an example "where there are restrictions on the building where the listing is located," and later that the host themselves needs to request ID from the guest in those circumstances. So, what does that mean? Does it mean that Airbnb only requires government ID when there restrictions in the building? Or does it mean they do not confirm government ID as part of this verification process at all? That's what it's sounding like to me.

 

Also, the next bit lists "what we may ask you for". What does that mean? In theory, Airbnb could ask for none of that and still claim the guest is verified.

 

First on the list is "Legal name, address and/or other personal information". There is no mention of asking for any proof of legal name or address, and what exactly does other personal information mean?

 

While a photo of government ID and possibly also a selfie alongside that are mentioned, again it's something that Airbnb 'may' ask guests for, and if the guest can't provide a selfie that matches the ID, guess what? They can provide some alternative form of verification instead. What would that alternative be, I wonder? Other personal information? A legal name/address without any documentation?

 

There is literally nothing stated in this article that reassures me that it's worth the paper it's written on, as it seems to be deliberately worded to be as clear as mud, nor that this 'multi-step identity verification process' has any meaning whatsoever.

 

The whole thing reads like a list of loopholes that gets Airbnb out of verifying anything, while at the same, the company is making a huge song and dance about how they are expanding the verification process in order to lure in new, unsuspecting hosts. 

Huma0
Level 10
London, United Kingdom

@Emilie 

 

And to add to that, the new 'good track record' filter specifies that guests will not be able to IB with the filter on if they broke policies/house rules recently.

 

What exactly does 'recently' mean? Seems to me yet another vague explanation, lacking essential detail, in order to provide a loophole for Airbnb to not protect hosts while they are claiming to do the opposite. 

Pippi1
Level 3
Auckland, New Zealand

I am not comfortable if guest IDs have not been verified and only found this out through reading this thread. I have deleted Instant Book for safety. I may lose bookings but it is unacceptable that unverified people can book instantly. Any thoughts?

Allan336
Level 2
Edinburgh, United Kingdom

To me instant book is a dreadful idea .

Maybe of some benefit to guests?

Certainly not to hosts . Have never done it , pretty much booked all year round

Emilie
Online Community Manager
Online Community Manager
London, United Kingdom

Hi @Pippi1,

 

Thanks for your comment! I just wanted to let you know that we've shared more details on this here: 

 

https://community.withairbnb.com/t5/Airbnb-updates/Details-on-Airbnb-s-update-to-instant-book-settin...

 

More specifically, the following info might be of interest to you: 

 

  • In the top 35 countries/regions on Airbnb, the “government-ID required” option has been automatically replaced with the new multi-step identity verification process, and removed as an Instant Book setting. Learn more about Airbnb’s verification process here
  • Hosts outside of the top 35 countries who previously selected the “government-ID required” option can now require Airbnb’s multi-step verification process. Learn more about Airbnb’s verification process here

I hope this helps!

 

Emilie

 

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Gillian166
Level 10
Hay Valley, Australia

@Emilie  just a quick question, is a profile photo now a standard requirement for all guests? Just had a guest query that with me, she couldn't book until she had a photo. 

 

I seem to remember I have ticked ✓require photo (and it's a bit concerning that she is questioning this, given I've since googled her and she runs a biz, with fb and insta and pics everywhere), but is the photo now a standard requirement of all guest profiles? 

JoandJoe0
Level 3
null

You mean the process that doesn't require a government ID, but only "may" require it?

 

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